Wednesday, August 15, 2012

toolz @ the manor

kymber here first to let you all know that our internet has been on the blink for the past several days - seems to be tip-tidy now tho! i will hit up all of your blogs and catch up on all of your posts during this evening and tomorrow! i hope that all of you are well. anyway - here' jambaloney:


jambaloney here!

sorry to have been off the blog for so long, but we have been going full tilt here, plus we added frankie blue eyes and i had the trip to ottawa... man, it is the middle of august ALREADY!!! ...this is a post i started almost a month ago - better late than never ;-)) ?? mostly about hand tools, with a nod to gorges grouse ;-))

so as i was digging the trench, i found that after a while, the tools get slippery as the handles get covered with mud and water - no matter, i bought some hockey tape a while back just for this problem....


i had found an old sledgehammer head in the basement when we moved in, i bought a handle for it recently which was a good thing because i needed it to smash rocks as the trench got deeper. i taped the handles of the pick and sledge - NICE!!

                                              

i use that pick all the time - and eventually, this happened.....


yep, broke the handle and nearly rattled all my teeth loose in the process.  hit a large rock hidden by clay square on.  it's the kind of thing that is bound to happen. fortunately, the pick was here when i arrived to, it was old as well. the first handle was cracked... i taped it, but it broke and i replaced it with the hickory handle you see above. that handles lasted about a year. the head is old enough to be worth something. i find the  alloys used in today's tools are crappy, you can tell by looking at the metal after it breaks. i broke this fork while building the huggie culture, notice the way it snapped, NOT fine steel.

                                    

here is a crappy pick buddy left ... steel snapped, not the handle (i can barely call it steel, more like a cast iron alloy of a sort), it is useful as a lightweight pick now that the weight is cut down ;-))




here is a third next to the other two on the right - a maddock that i busted clearing ice last winter. the steel in these is crap..



however the following tools are mint, on the top is a trench tool that my step-dad ted gave me, on the bottom is a wide pronged fork that came from my grandmother - each prong can be individually removed... no garbage cast metal here!

                           

back to the broken pickaxe, i could only get a handle with a plastic flare on it, still, it should do the trick.

\

to drill out the  old handle i turn to powertool help - trusty ryobi 18v drill and an irwin speedbor max bit ( i got this kit on sale, they are fantastic!!))


a normally hard job, takes minutes..





all done!!



handle on and ready to go!!



sky pic for helga...



trout for pp...



and a scrutty project manager for winston ;-))



cheers all!!


50 comments:

  1. they don't make em like they used to! I have broken a couple of mauls and I almost broke my own pick last night when I was digging out more walkway..luckily the rock gave instead of my pick..but the stone shards went everywhere..and after that I was digging out the trech with a pickaxe type thing and did not notice a bunch of dirt stuck on the digging end, until I hoisted it up above my head to clear out more...and the stuck dirt dislodged onto my head!..dirty work!

    ..tape helps but so do nice heavy workgloves..I always have a pair on these days..and we have about 60 pair kicking around the homestead

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  2. ..and always having workgloves on is why my posts have so many spelling mistakes! hehe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i know you post via cell - can't imagine using work gloves - ;-))

      i was using the tape to keep the tools form flying - my favorite workgloves are calf leather which get slippy in the rain i have seen vintage axeheads and whatnot on ebay, but shipping makes them real expensive!!

      it is dirty work - if you plan on doing a lot of trenching, order that trenching tool:

      http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=51123&cat=2,42578,40769&ap=1

      it is the bomb and lee valley makes quality gear!!

      cheer pal!!

      Delete
  3. Most everything today is junk. When I find good old tools, I grab 'em!

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    Replies
    1. i hear you - with hand tools the real problem is the casting and alloys... the good old USA used to make dynamite steel, you can find vintage stuff on e-bay - if it is near you, you might get a good deal!

      thanks for stopping by craig!

      Delete
  4. Hey Kymber and Jambaloney,

    I have to agree with Craig, when you have or find old tools grab them up or fix them up and keep using them. Tools are made now to be thrown away and thats such a shame. And.....um stop working so darn hard, bahahahah......
    I see Winston is on full alert :-) it that because he's managing or gaurding his home?

    Yet another beautiful sky and fish picture, I'm going to have to eat my jealous here :P

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  5. OMG - you totally gave me a laugh!!

    Winston is our buddy and he doesn't like cats that much - so i included a pic of noddle head (the project manager) for him - hahahah!

    i told him the next stray we take in will be called winston... i got a stern rebuke ;-))

    i will stop working so hard when the bloody thing is done... then it's on to the green house etc.

    sorry you feel jealous.. it is a real nice place we have here - just needs work!

    thanks sandy - hope you are well!

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  6. Hey Guys - Oh yeah - the old handle breaks... aren't we all too familiar with the crap that's sold these days. The part that gets me is when the tag on a new handle says - high quality steel built to last.

    It should read - poor quality shit not made to last so buy twelve before even thinking about putting them to work !

    Have a good one and many thanks for the sky pic !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i would never trust a label - only a manufacturer.. and even that isn't a guarantee these days ;-))

      i am too happy you enjoyed the pic - you take care helga!!

      Delete
    2. Hi Lotta Joy ! It was sure nice of your daughter to have gotten you tools like that. That tells a lot about what a fine person she is and how much she loves you ! I laughed at the wasbund word - you are really, really are a hoot ! You could easily be a comedian too - your talent is endless dear lady ! :))

      Take Care and have a good day !

      Delete
  7. LOL, Gotcha covered, Bud. Name some scruttie after me and I'll fire up the barbie. So, think about it.

    I still think you should tie him to your boats painter and see how fast he can get your boat home. Likely quicker than old tired six ponies.

    Sure wish I had some emoticons here, LMHO. Or lay a pic on you. Guess that will have to be a PM.

    HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHA, C'mon, help an old man get up!

    Winston

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    Replies
    1. given the distance. i'll take the chance - that would have to be one hell of a barbie - LOL!

      scrutties don' like water enough to be useful as a replacement for 6 horses - maybe you could lend us moncon???

      get up, you have stalls to build rolf!

      Delete
  8. Jambe,

    Last time I broke a handle, I sprayed hydraulic fluid everywhere, LMHO. You need to crawl out of that ditch before everyone here starts wondering just what it is you do there. We all know it is NOT just digging.

    Hugs to you both.

    Winston.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. on the cat ??

      i wish it were something else... but no... rocks and clay - that's about all there is to the story!!!

      back at you form us both buddy!!

      Delete
  9. I'd never heard it called "hockey tape", but grew up calling it "friction tape." I googled the former term and learned that it comes in some right-pretty colors, as opposed to friction tape's basic black.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. hahahaha!!

      sorry to laugh gorges - but it really IS hockey tape - it's to tape the handles of hockey sticks. the stuff is pretty cheap and probably thinner than friction tape...

      i bought black because that was what was on sale... 3 rolls for 7 bucks ;-))

      Delete
  10. maybe you should look into making your own tools with a homebuilt forge and anvil

    Wildflower

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    Replies
    1. hmm - tempting idea wf, but i have several jobs i should probably complete before i make a forge ;-)))

      i would LOVE to be a blacksmith. probably a real dying art these days.. maybe in another life

      cheers!

      Delete
  11. I thought Lacrosse was the actual official sport of Canada? So shouldn't it be Lacrosse tape?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. you are correct about the "official" sport.. most people play hockey - it is a religion in canada.

      that being said, i think both sports use the same tape ;-)) i played neither sport, but i do have a canoe!!

      Delete
  12. Jamby - MMMMM Trout. One method I have done for removing the handles from inside the tools with the solid metal tops or even the open ones is to burn them out in the wood stove. If I do it after closing the vents it doesn't get hot enough to effect the temper at least on the good old time tools anyway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that is a great idea - i plan on getting us a wood stove soon enough so i'll try your method!

      i imagine it would clean off the rust too!

      Delete
  13. I just went back and looked and those are some damned fine looking trout. Wow.

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    Replies
    1. they really are - you'll have to come fishing some day!!

      Delete
  14. kymber - Am having the same internet problems - on / off - so frustrating. Hope this comment makes it - my others recently haven't...

    jamba - Nothing more satisfying than repairing as opposed to replacing. Well done :) I agree - they don't make steel like they used to...!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. thank dani - it is more satisfying to repair, i love bringing life back to old things!!

      crappy steel means that replacing things is a necessity... better for a disposable society in the long run, such a shame - thanks for dropping in!

      Delete
  15. Nice job fixing the tool :) I hate when tools break :(

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    Replies
    1. thanks donna - i hate it too, but at least these hand tools are fixable, i once spend days trying to get life back into a cordless drill to no avail..

      cheers!

      Delete
  16. Replies
    1. a gwannnn.. !!

      thanks tho', you are too kind ;-)

      Delete
  17. During my extreme kindness to my wasbund during our divorce, I allowed him to spend the day gathering his stuff from the house, the garage and our shed. Later I realized he had cleaned out ALL the tools of my dad's. OLD tools that had a life, and many lives left in them. I was desolate AND tooless.

    That Christmas, I opened the largest box I've ever seen. It was from my daughter. She had gone to Sears and spent a fortune, but inside that box was a replaced set of tools, skill saw, sawsall, and a tool box. For ME.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that was a nice gesture on your part, criminal on his and thoughtful of your daughter..

      you still have those tools - sears makes great stuff!

      cheers lotta!

      Delete
  18. lotta joy,
    That is sad and mean of ex!

    I have no new tools. All mine were bought at yard sales. Of course, they could still be trash, but at least I paid $2 rather than upwards of $30. Well, the last new shovel I bought was in 1975. I have so many tool heads that need a handle!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. old tools rock the house pp - you need to have a "handle day" and fix them all in one go!

      cheers!

      Delete
  19. The only advantage to crappy new tools is it makes you seem really strong when you manage to break them.

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    Replies
    1. hmm - never thought of it that way, i am usually too pissed at the interruption to see that bright side - LOL!

      Delete
  20. Over the years, I've bought lots of old tools at estate sales. Not only is the metal better, but the handles that came in them are better than those that can be bought in big box stores these days. I've got them all repaired now but the next time I break a handle, I'm going to have to source some nice slow growth hickory handles instead of whatever they are made from these days for the big box stores. The metal goes without saying, will no doubt last my lifetime and perhaps my children's as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i got a bunch of old tools form my grandads and a lot garbage picking as well - NOTHING beats old steel!

      i agree that handles these days aren't the best - no hickory here. i am thinking of getting a draw knife and giving the birch and/or tamarack a shot at being handle material - if that works, i will be delighted to be able to make handles of custom length and shape - do you know if those woods are good?

      cheers!

      Delete
    2. i got a bunch of old tools form my grandads and a lot garbage picking as well - NOTHING beats old steel!

      i agree that handles these days aren't the best - no hickory here. i am thinking of getting a draw knife and giving the birch and/or tamarack a shot at being handle material - if that works, i will be delighted to be able to make handles of custom length and shape - do you know if those woods are good?

      cheers!

      Delete
  21. I wouldn't think birch would be very good and I don't have experience with tamarack. But I certainly wouldn't hesitate to try them if I had a plentiful supply on my land.

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  22. birch and tamarak are the tow heaviest wood i have available - i have read that birch can work in a pinch - i'll try both as you suggested..

    cheers!!

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